TRT Treatment: Male Osteoporosis in Relation to Low Testosterone Levels

Most men consider having low testosterone as a bane in their existence, and the only time they are likely to hear about TRT treatment is when their bodies already require it.

TRT Treatment: Male Osteoporosis in Relation to Low Testosterone Levels

Testosterone deficiency can wreak havoc to the sex life of men and may even cause their libido to go down. But beyond this aspect of the male sexuality, another important area that is likely to suffer from a low concentration of testosterone in a man’s bloodstream is their bone density.

Medical experts and the scientific community believe that low testosterone level in men can lead to osteoporosis, a  disease characterized by decreased bone density. If the bone density has been compromised, it will render the bone structure to become weaker and fragile. Such poor condition of their bones increases the man’s susceptibility to suffer from bone fractures, particularly in the hip, spine or wrist area.

Men Can Have Osteoporosis too?

Yes, men can have and can suffer from osteoporosis, too. It is not only women who can acquire osteoporosis but men can be at risk, too.

Contrary to popular notion, osteoporosis is not exclusive to women alone. Perhaps, the underlying reason why we have associated this illness to women most of the time is that it afflicts them more than men, especially after they are past the age of menopause. Consequently, this has ingrained to our minds that osteoporosis is a woman’s issue when in fact it is not because it also afflicts men.

Women suffering from this condition can’t be said as having the best medical care there is,  unfortunately, the situation for men with osteoporosis is far from being better. This is despite the fact that that one-third of cases of hip fractures occurred are suffered by men.

Did you know that in Spain,  men suffering from osteoporotic hip fractures comprise 26% of all the reported cases of hip fractures from that country?

Female Estrogen in Relation to Osteoporosis

We are accustomed to associating the risk of hip fracture with old age, even if 50% of these cases occur in men that are below 80 years old.  In order for us to fully understand how a deficiency in testosterone is associated with osteoporosis in men, we might need to start looking at it first from the women’s angle.  

We begin with the female sex hormone, estrogen. This hormone is crucial to the bone health of women, in the very same way that testosterone is responsible for the overall health of bones in men. Both hormones, though, protect the bones from losing their density.

The moment that women enter their menopausal stage, that is going to be the moment in time that their ovaries would stop its estrogen production. Decreased concentration of estrogen in women’s bloodstream will eventually pave the way for them to have low bone density.

By the time this moment comes, they are at a greater risk to have osteoporosis and may only be a matter of time before symptoms would start to manifest.

TRT Treatment is the Hope for Osteoporosis in Men

This now brings us to this one important question here, how can a female hormone have an impact on men? Here you go now, testosterone, a measly part of this male sex hormone, is converted to estrogen.

It goes to show that if you have a low level of testosterone in your body, it translates to a low level of estrogen conversion, too, right?  This scenario here now will put a man’s bone structure in peril.

What option then is left for a man to take?

TRT( Testosterone replacement therapy)  is a practical option to take, nothing else.  

In addition to the testosterone replacement treatment, your physician is also likely to suggest that you engage yourself into some sort of physically engaging exercise. In addition to that, he might also advise you to increase your calcium  intake via supplements.

In such cases, it is best that you reach out to your trusted physician, who will help you develop the best plan of action you can take.

For Brisbane Link – TRT in Brisbane

Resource

https://www.sexhealthmatters.org/did-you-know/low-testosterone-osteoporosis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3557324/